Use the icon on pages to add to favorites.

See & Do

{{::favorite.region}}

{{::favorite.title}}

{{::favorite.excerpt}}

Editorials

{{::favorite.region}}

{{::favorite.title}}

{{::favorite.excerpt}}

Events

{{::favorite.region}}

{{::favorite.title}}

{{::favorite.excerpt}}

experiance our best

Sightseeing Spots

Múlafossur Waterfall, Gásadalur

A must see for any visitor to the Faroe Island!

One of the biggest tourist attraction on the Faroe Island, and to good reason, the view on Gásadalur and Múlafossur is spectacular: the waterfall that just falls off the island. A breathtaking panorama both towards the village and the close-by Mykines island.

To read more about Múlafossur follow the link below

The Lakes of Vágar

How about a nice trip to one (or several) of the lakes of Vágar? Vágar is enriched with four beautiful lakes. Among these the both the largest and the second largest lakes of the Faroe Islands, Sørvágsvatn/Leitisvatn and Fjallavatn respectively. Or what about a trip to the more remote and heart shaped Vatndalsvatn?

Follow the link below to read more about the lakes of Vágar

Trøllkonufingur

Trøllkonufingur is a 313 m tall monolith on the south-east side of Sandavágur. Only 11 people are known to have reached the top of Trøllkonufingur.

Legend has it, that Trøllkonufingur is the finger of a witch that came to throw the Faroe Islands to Iceland. When she came to the sea south of Vágar, the sun came up and she was turned into stone and fell into the ocean.

To read more about Trøllkonufingur follow the link below

Tindhólmur

Tindhólmur is an islet west of Vágar. The view of the small island is spectacular and rare. The scape of the island is unique due to the five peaks. These are named Ytsti, Arni, Lítli, Breiði, Bogdi which can be translated into: Farthest, Eagle, Small, Broad and Bent. Tindhólmur is uninhabited and has an area of 650,000 square meters. The highest point of Tindhólmur is 262 meters.

Tindhólmur has a very gloomy legend attached to it, to read more about this follow the link below.

Árnafjall

Árnafjall, with it’s 722m, is the highest mountain on Vágar. It is located on the north-west side of the island, above Gásadalur.

Hiking up to Árnafjall is not the easiest, and is not recommended for those with a fear of heights. Not only does the ascend require some climbing, but when you find yourself on the summit, the vertical drop ahead can make you feel faint. However, if you can get past your fear, Árnafjall is an amazing experience. From the summit you will see the entire green colour spectrum when looking out to Barið to the west, Víkar below and the north of Streymoy to the east.

Drangarnir

One of the most unique sights in the Faroe Islands are “Drangarnir”. Drangarnir are two sea stacks between Vágar and the islet Tindhólmur. The distinct names of Drangarnir are Stóri Drangur and Lítli Drangur which can be translated into Large- and Small sea stack.

The viewpoint for Drangarnir can only be reached by walking though private land. Therefore, this viewpoint can only be reached by a guided tour.

For more information about a guided tour follow the link below

Bøsdalafossur and Geituskorardrangur

Bøsdalafossur is the waterfall that flows from the lake Leitisvatn/Sørvágsvatn and into the Atlantic ocean. It has a height of 30 meters. Geituskoradrangur is the beautiful sea stack that can be seen from the same view-point as Bøsdalafossur

The waterfall Bøsdalafossur is a magnificent sight as it thunders down towards the sea. This area alone, with its waterfall, ocean and lake, has been much depicted in dramatic weather in winter, when natural forces struggle against each other.

To read more about Bøsdalafossur follow the link below

Trælanípa (Slave Cliff)

Trælanípa (Slave Cliff) is a perpendicular rock wall, which juts 142 metres upwards out of the sea. Supposedly, it has gotten its name from the Viking Age when slaves were pushed off the mountain. Be careful not to get too close to the edge as it is steep! From here, you can see the southernmost part of Streymoy, Hestur, Koltur, Sandoy, Skúvoy and Suðuroy.

Photo by: Federica Di Nardo

Slættanes

Slættanes is an abandoned village north of Sandavágur. Slættanes is now only used for summerhouses.

Slættanes lies on the northern coast of the island. It was founded in 1835 by Hendrik Thomasen and belonged to the municipality of Sandavágur. During its best years (1945 to 1950) around 130 people lived in the village, but the average population was around 70. There were 12 houses in Slættanes. However, in 1965 the last inhabitants left the community because of its relatively isolated location.

A road was never built to Slættanes, but there are many trails there. One goes to Sandavágur in the southeast, another to Sørvágur to the south.

more

Attractions and Culture

Museums and Attractions

Museums and Attractions

Churches

Churches

The Lakes of Vágar

The Lakes of Vágar

Lakeside Sightseeing

Lakeside Sightseeing

Music

Music

Sport

Sport